Suppositories – Why The French Have It Right!

Suppository
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Ok, so we’re not used to sticking drugs up our bums in this country, but suppositories are the choice of delivery in countries like France, and they may have something with this..!

I had occasion recently to find alternative antibiotic delivery mechanisms because of the sheer number of allergens and additives in the ones given to a patient they couldn’t tolerate. Meds commonly contain lactose, gluten, wheat starch, maize starch, colours, flavourings, sugars, sweeteners, plastic compounds etc which just would not be acceptable in many foods. I think it is shocking.

In desperation I looked at some of the different types of the same antibiotic available – it was Flagyl – and it comes in tablets, suspension or, much more rarely, suppositories. Here are the various ingredients for you to compare:

Tablets: Calcium hydrogen phosphate (E341), Starch maize, Povidone K30 (E1201), Magnesium stearate (E572), Tablet coat: Pharmacoat 615 (E464), Macrogol 400 Ph. Eur.

Suspension (liquid): Liquid sugar granular liquors (sucrose), Sodium dihydrogen phosphate LC or sodium acid phosphate crystalline, Veegum HV, Methyl hydroxybenzoate (E218), Propyl hydroxybenzoate (E216), Ethanol 96% v/v, Lemon No. 1 NA, Oil orange terpeneless, Purified water.

Suppositories: Suppository base E75, Suppository base W35.

Can you see the difference in the length of the ingredients, for a start? The message: suppositories here contain simply the antibiotic and 2 bases which are meltable fats made from palm and coconut oil most often. I know because I rang the manufacturer to find out.

So, next time you need any meds, remember first to check the ingredients out for allergens and additives and, second, if you want to avoid toxins and don’t mind the thought of it, choose suppositories and make like the French! 

NB: You may need to get them ordered in for you as we don’t use them often in the UK.

9 Replies to “Suppositories – Why The French Have It Right!”

  1. What an excellent bit of detective work! It can be really difficult for people with allergies who need medication as although, theoretically, you can get meds prescribed without allergens in the excipients, it is actually an amazing lizard drill and sometimes not even possible. We will spread the word. Thanks as always!

  2. Wish a lot of other meds were available this way. I’m sure I have a problem with a lot of supplements etc. not because of the supplement but because of all the fillers etc. or the housing the capsule or tablet is in.

    That’s why whenever possible I go for tinctures/drops etc.

    1. I think you’re absolutely right, Janet, and I often recommend patients take them out of the capsules and use just the powder or use liquid ones. Trouble is, I find that the liquid ones are never strong enough to do any real good, there is no one liquid multi I think is good enough and you end up having to take several individual liquid minerals and vitamins and still don’t get a good enough therapeutic dosage in my opinion! I am working on finding a range of supplements which has none of the common allergens in, but did you know, for example, that most vitamin C in supplements is derived from corn, for example? No, I didn’t either until recently!

  3. Didn’t know that about Vit C – I’ve got Vit C from H & B in the powdered form and it doesn’t contain any extras. Someone said it was good for stomach bloating but then someone said it makes you gain weight – so I’m quite puzzled. But on searching through the internet I’m sure it said Vit C increases stomach acid so maybe that’s why – maybe I do lack stomach acid.

    My problem I’ve found – and still I’m not sure what causes it – but could be the fillers and binders is a lot of things I take make my face puffy and bloated. But then it applies to food and supplements and if Im honest there’s not a common denominator in either!

  4. PS By the way love the newsletter – absolutely brilliant, good reading and good content. Hope they come out regularly!

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